A Featherless Biped

Things I like: Buddhism, psychology, archaeology, architecture, agriculture, hot guys, pizza, sci-fi, philosophy, classics, and a few other things.



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Reblogged from afeatherlessbiped

Ok guys, I’m going to try something…

afeatherlessbiped:

I am going to unfollow everyone, and see if I can rebuild my Tumblr community entirely. Hopefully, I will see you guys again by other means :) Until then, ciao!~

It didn’t work XD Don’t do it XD

Reblogged from skeptv

skeptv:

What Is The Hottest Place On Earth?

We’ve talked about Venus, the hottest planet in the Solar System, but we know things can get pretty hot here on Earth, too.

You may be wondering, where on the surface of the Earth has the highest natural temperature been recorded?

The location of this world record has had some controversy, but as of 2013, the hottest spot on record was the Furnace Creek Ranch in California’s Death Valley.

On July 10, 1913, weather instruments measured 56.7 degrees Celsius, or 134 degrees Fahrenheit.

via Fraser Cain.

Reblogged from spaceplasma

spaceplasma:

Black Hole Caught Red-Handed in a Stellar Homicide

These images, taken with NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Pan-STARRS1 telescope in Hawaii, show a brightening inside a galaxy caused by a flare from its nucleus. The arrow in each image points to the galaxy. The flare is a signature of the galaxy’s central black hole shredding a star that wandered too close.

The computer-simulated gif animation shows gas from a tidally shredded star falling into a black hole. Some of the gas also is being ejected at high speeds into space. Astronomers observed the flare in ultraviolet light using NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and in optical light using the Pan-STARRS1 telescope. The light comes from gas falling into the black hole, and glowing helium from the star’s helium-rich gas expelled from the system.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHU/UCSC

(via colliderblog)

Reblogged from skeptv

skeptv:

Bill Nye Asks Does Jupiter Have A Core?

In this episode of the groundbreaking web-series Why With Nye, legendary educator Bill Nye will explore Jupiter’s mysterious core. Watch as Nye shows you how NASA’s Juno spacecraft will use a combination of cutting edge technology and the good old Doppler effect to take a peek deep inside Jupiter.

via THNKR TV. Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thnkr
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thnkrtv
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/thnkr/

Reblogged from scanzen
scanzen:

The Spectacular Fiery Death of the Albert Einstein Spacecraft
This amazing reentry fireworks was observed from the International Space Station on 2 November at 12:04 GMT. We can see European Space Agency’s fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle, Albert Einstein, disintegrating and burning up in the atmosphere over an uninhabited area of the Pacific Ocean, in the most spectacular way, after it left the International Space Station a week earlier with 1.6 tonnes of waste.
Source of gif: ESA/NASA

scanzen:

The Spectacular Fiery Death of the Albert Einstein Spacecraft

This amazing reentry fireworks was observed from the International Space Station on 2 November at 12:04 GMT. We can see European Space Agency’s fourth Automated Transfer Vehicle, Albert Einstein, disintegrating and burning up in the atmosphere over an uninhabited area of the Pacific Ocean, in the most spectacular way, after it left the International Space Station a week earlier with 1.6 tonnes of waste.

Source of gif: ESA/NASA

(via itsfullofstars)

Reblogged from skeptv

skeptv:

Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains Why Geostationary Orbits Don’t Degrade

Why don’t satellites in geostationary orbit around Earth crash? Find out when astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and Eugene Mirman answer a fan’s Cosmic Query, which also involved ancient civilizations on Earth.

via Star Talk Radio.

Reblogged from skeptv

skeptv:

Astronomy Cast 319: The Zodiac

Although the Zodiac is best known for astrology nonsense, it has a purpose in astronomy too. The constellations of the Zodiac define the plane of the ecliptic: the region where the Sun, Moon and planets appear to travel through the sky. What are the constellations of the Zodiac, and how do astronomers use them as way points?

Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/105854/astronomy-cast-319-the-zodiac/

Duration: 54:25

via Fraser Cain.

Reblogged from the-star-stuff
the-star-stuff:

It looks beautiful at a distance but don’t be fooled. Luckily, we’re not affected by the typhoon but the other parts of the Philippines are very well affected, right now. (Photo by Japan Meteorological Agency and EUMETSAT)

the-star-stuff:

It looks beautiful at a distance but don’t be fooled. Luckily, we’re not affected by the typhoon but the other parts of the Philippines are very well affected, right now. (Photo by Japan Meteorological Agency and EUMETSAT)

(Source: Slate, via itsfullofstars)

Reblogged from ageofpuppy
ageofreason:

Is this not the main point of mindfulness? By being completely observant of yourself and your surroundings you can pull yourself away from the negative feelings and realize that your current circumstances are nothing compared to the beauty of the world and your own life.

ageofreason:

Is this not the main point of mindfulness? By being completely observant of yourself and your surroundings you can pull yourself away from the negative feelings and realize that your current circumstances are nothing compared to the beauty of the world and your own life.

Reblogged from ageofpuppy

Reblogged from ageofpuppy
ageofreason:

This is very powerful.

ageofreason:

This is very powerful.

Reblogged from archaeologicalnews
Reblogged from archaeologicalnews
Reblogged from samanthro
Reblogged from theancientworld
theancientworld:

Fragment of a military diploma, Mid-Imperial, Trajanic, 113/14 a.d.RomanBronze 
Most surviving Roman military diploma belonged to  army veterans. These discharge papers, however, were issued by the  emperor Trajan to sailors on a warship, a quadrireme, in the imperial  fleet based in Misenum on the Bay of Naples. The ship may have formed  part of the flotilla that escorted the emperor from Italy to the East  for the Parthian War (114–117 A.D.).

theancientworld:

Fragment of a military diploma, Mid-Imperial, Trajanic, 113/14 a.d.
Roman
Bronze

Most surviving Roman military diploma belonged to army veterans. These discharge papers, however, were issued by the emperor Trajan to sailors on a warship, a quadrireme, in the imperial fleet based in Misenum on the Bay of Naples. The ship may have formed part of the flotilla that escorted the emperor from Italy to the East for the Parthian War (114–117 A.D.).